Research

Research

NCMN Research
Research


Research areas within NCMN

Faculty research areas include atomic manipulation, properties affected by nanoscale dimensions, self-assembly, ordered nanoarrays, quantum dots and wires, nanoelectronics, quantum computing, nanomechanics, nanooptics, nanoelectromechanical systems, and molecular design.

Learn more about individual faculty research interests

NCMN researchers have individual pages with research and publications listed, as well as links to individual faculty research information and department affiliations.


Acknowledgement Text

Agencies including NSF and the University providing partial support of our Nebraska Nanoscale Facilities and NCMN Facilities require that the following words be included at the end of any Acknowledgement section of a paper in which experimental work was done in NNF-NCMN facilities:

The research was performed in part in the Nebraska Nanoscale Facility: National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure and the Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, which are supported by the National Science Foundation under Award ECCS: 1542182, and the Nebraska Research Initiative.




Research Highlights

Christian Binek
Christian Binek
Controlling Elasticity with Magnetism

Christian Binek has found that, under certain conditions, the magnetic properties of a material can predict the relationship between its elasticity and temperature. You can read more about his findings here. (7/19/17)

Pannier and Dudley
Andrew Dudley and Angela Pannier
Milestone in Effort to Treat Bone Disorders

A recent study by Pannier and colleagues from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and University of Nebraska Medical Center has reported progress toward the bioengineering of cartilage that could help treat disorders known to disrupt the normal development of bones. (7/19/17)

Polymer Device
Illustration of a device fabricated by UNL physicists.
Discovery Could Increase Functionality of Electronics

Xia Hong, Stephen Ducharme and colleagues have demonstrated a method for altering the properties of a nanoscopic material, pointing the way toward merging several functions of modern electronics into a single component. (6/7/17)